Sandra Buehler

Made in SomoS participant, graphic designer, filmmaker and new media artist Sandra Buehler investigates the complexity and dynamics of space and man, researching narrative systems and employing nonlinear storytelling.

Initially Buehler studied graphic design in Switzerland. After moving to Berlin, she studied “Visual Communication” and “New Media Art/Experimental Film” at the University of the Arts Berlin (UdK) with teachers Heinz Emigholz and Michael Busch, where her creative output begins to focus on the moving image and audio visual performance.

2009 Sandra Buehler received a scholarship from the Musashino Art University in Tokyo, to study “the logic of signs and images.” 2011 the artist received a scholarship for the master program «Film/Video/Media art» at the California Institute of the Arts (Calarts, USA) concentrating on documentary filmmaking and experimental animation with teachers James Beninng, Betzy Bromberg, Charlotte Pryce and Eric Dyer.

As SomoS resident artist 2013/14, Sandra Buehler took part in SomoS’ exhibition Allgemeinplaetze + Nahaufnahmen (featuring Larissa Fassler, Donato Del Giudice, Melchior de Tinguy du Pouet and Momus). For this presentation Sandra Buehler presented her
stunningly crafted experimental film about Berlin, Demolitions Blues, and collaborated on the 16mm film Laura 21st 08 2013, Berlin with SomoS resident 2013/14 photographer Donato Del Giudice.

Sandra Buehler: Demolition Blues

Buehler’s 11 minute fim Demolitions Blues is inspired by Franz Kafka’s “The 8 Oktavhefte” (1917), in which the author notes “Every person carries a room in himself. This fact can even be checked by ear. If one goes fast and you listen carefully, for instance at night, when everything around is quiet, one hears, for example, the clatter of a insufficiently mounted mirror.”

Demolitions Blues questions man’s attempts to dominate space through architecture, which easily turns into its opposite: space dominating people. To Buehler, people are products of the spaces in which they live; inevitably linked to them until the end. To describe space without being captured in its classification system is utopian.
The labyrinthine network of Demolitions Blues hints at a plethora of opportunities and relationships, and exposes the viewer to examples of hyper-cultural coexistence.

The film’s leads us along chains and chain reactions. An overview is missing, everything seems to slip away: endless ramifications, corridors with crowded rooms, passages and transitions, oblique angles, anarchy and confusion. The openings and closings of the space create the narrative conditions and their mazes. Time and perspective loose meaning.
Yet the confusion comes not from outside, it lies within, subtle and intangible. The (dream) world knows no exterior, no way out exists. Caught under this shelter, we are at the mercy of treacherous events: shifts and distortions break isolated spaces and subjects. The horizon collapses, the identity disappears, the ego dissolves into a crooked construction chaos.

www.sandrabuehler.com