Support the Open Art Shelter by Give Something Back to Berlin

creative work with female and child refugees

from: 10.12.2016

It was a great pleasure to host the storytelling and fundraising dinner by GSBTB – Give Something Back to Berlin, December 13th 2016 at SomoS. If you’d like to support this non-profit organization’s important creative work for female/child refugees at Berlin Tempelhof refugee camp, please visit their Open Art Shelter crowdfunding campaign page.

About the Open Art Shelter

To alleviate the isolated situation of the refugees at Berlin Tempelhof refugee camp, where whole families live in dire circumstances, the GSBTB organizes a weekly Open Art Shelter for females and children: a safe creative environment where thoughts and feelings can be expressed freely, healing from trauma can begin and intercultural dialog can develop.

Open Art Shelter – Photo: GSBTB

Every week 100-150 women and children take part in the dynamic and multi-faceted Open Art Shelter program, which takes place both within and outside of the refugee camp, and involves:
– making art, crafting and other creative activities
– integrative individual psychotherapy
– sewing and tailoring, also with the aim of strengthening the female refugees’ financial situation
– nature and city excursions, visiting theater, museums and cinemas
– childcare to create free time for the women
– creating murals for political or aesthetic expression
– creatively developing language skills in German, English, Farsi, Arab and Russian

About Give Something Back To Berlin

Give Something Back To Berlin (GSBTB) is “a project platform and network facilitating neighborhood volunteer work for the growing group of non German-speakers. Its community of skilled volunteers from over 60 nationalities are active in vibrant projects and collaborations throughout the city. This engagement is challenging the current discourse in Germany between newly arrived and established communities; building positive outcomes.

GSBTB creates tools for community integration bringing “privileged” migrants, German locals and vulnerable groups such as refugees together. Through their extensive grassroots initiatives they create meeting points for communities that would otherwise naturally stay isolated from one another. This concrete “think global, act local” program showcases everyone’s capacity to contribute regardless of passport, status, language or time spent in the country.”

Please explore the following links to support GSBTB and read more about their work.

Links:
GSBTB Open Art Shelter Crowdfunding Campaign
GSBTB Homepage
GSBTB on Facebook